Scientific Sessions

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Scientific Sessions

Conference Elite appreciate your participation in this Conference. Every Conference is divided into several sessions of subfields. Select the Subfield of your choice please.

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Session 1 :Physics

Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves. Physics is the natural science that studies matter and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics enable advances in new technologies such as understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society such as television, computers, domestic appliances, nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus. This session discusses more about physics.

Session 2 :Classical & Modern Physics

The laws comprising classical physics remain very widely used for objects on everyday scales travelling at non-relativistic speeds, since they provide a very close approximation in such situations, and theories such as quantum mechanics and the theory of relativity simplify to their classical equivalents at such scales. However, inaccuracies in classical mechanics for very small objects and very high velocities led to the development of modern physics in the 20th century. Modern physics is the post-Newtonian conception of physics. It implies that classical descriptions of phenomena are lacking, and that an accurate modern description of nature requires theories to incorporate elements of quantum mechanics or Einsteinian relativity, or both. In general, the term is used to refer to any branch of physics either developed in the early 20th century and onwards, or branches greatly influenced by early 20th century physics. This session discusses more about classical & modern physics.

Session 3 :Condensed Matter Physics

Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of matter. Condensed matter physics is the largest field of contemporary physics. Historically, condensed matter physics grew out of solid-state physics, which is now considered one of its main subfields. The term condensed matter physics was apparently coined by Philip Anderson when he renamed his research group, previously solid-state theory, in 1967. It is concerned with the condensed phases that appear whenever the number of constituents in a system is extremely large and the interaction between the constituents is strong. The most familiar examples of condensed phases are solids and liquids which arise from the electromagnetic forces between atoms. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, they include the laws of quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. This session discusses more about condensed matter physics.

Session 4 :Astro-Particle Physics & Cosmology

Cosmology deals with the study of the origin, evolution, and eventual fate of the universe. Physical cosmology is the scientific study of the universe's origin, its large-scale structures and dynamics, and its ultimate fate, as well as the scientific laws that govern these areas. Astro-particle physics is a branch of particle physics that studies elementary particles of astronomical origin and their relation to astrophysics and cosmology. It is a relatively new field of research emerging at the intersection of particle physics, astronomy, astrophysics, detector physics, relativity, solid state physics, and cosmology. Modern astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that employs the principles of physics and chemistry to ascertain the nature of the astronomical objects. Among the objects studied are the sun, other stars, galaxies, extra-solar planets, the interstellar medium and the cosmic microwave background. Their emissions are examined across all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the properties examined include luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition. This session discusses more about cosmology, modern astrophysics, and astro-particle physics.

 

Session 5 :Material Physics

Material physics is the use of physics to describe the physical properties of materials. It is a synthesis of physical sciences such as chemistry, solid mechanics, solid state physics, and materials science. Materials physics is considered a subset of condensed matter physics and applies fundamental condensed matter concepts to complex multiphase media, including materials of technological interest. Current fields that materials physicists work in include electronic, optical, and magnetic materials, novel materials and structures, quantum phenomena in materials, nonequilibrium physics, and soft condensed matter physics. New experimental and computational tools are constantly improving how materials systems are modeled and studied and are also fields when materials physicists work in. This session discusses more about material physics.

 

Session 6 :High Energy Nuclear Physics

High-energy nuclear physics studies the behavior of nuclear matter in energy regimes typical of high energy physics. The primary focus of this field is the study of heavy-ion collisions as compared to lower atomic mass atoms in other particle accelerators. At sufficient collision energies, these types of collisions are theorized to produce the quark–gluon plasma. In peripheral nuclear collisions at high energies one expects to obtain information on the electromagnetic production of leptons and mesons which are not accessible in electron-positron colliders due to their much smaller luminosities. Previous high-energy nuclear accelerator experiments have studied heavy-ion collisions using projectile energies of 1 GeV/nucleon up to 158 GeV/nucleon. This session discusses more about high energy nuclear physics.

Session 7 :Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics

Atomic, molecular, and optical physics (AMO) is the study of matter-matter and light-matter interactions; at the scale of one or a few atoms and energy scales around several electron volts. The three areas are closely interrelated. AMO theory includes classical, semi-classical and quantum treatments. Typically, the theory and applications of emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation from excited atoms and molecules, analysis of spectroscopy, generation of lasers and masers, and the optical properties of matter in general fall into these categories. Atomic physics is the subfield of atomic molecular & optical that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus, while molecular physics is the study of the physical properties of molecules. The term atomic physics is often associated with nuclear power and nuclear bombs, due to the synonymous use of atomic and nuclear in Standard English. Molecular physics, while closely related to atomic physics also overlaps greatly with theoretical chemistry, physical chemistry and chemical physics. This session discusses more about atomic, molecular, and optical physics (AMO).

Session 8 :Quantum Science & Technology

Quantum Science and Technology has now become one of the fastest growing areas of research, characterized by its truly multidisciplinary nature and the significant potential it has for wide-ranging technological innovation. It deals with the advances in fundamental quantum information science and related quantum-enabled technologies. Quantum science & technology and information is a rapidly expanding, fast-moving, and inherently multidisciplinary field that spans fundamental research to applied science. Quantum Science and Technology brings together the diverse subject communities that are now working on all aspects of quantum information science and quantum-enabled technologies. Leading quantum computing experts from around the world have explored what the future holds for the field of Quantum Science and Technology. This session discusses more about quantum science and technology.

Session 9 :Nano-Technology

Nanotechnology operates on the interfaces of traditional scientific areas. It has already contributed substantially to the understanding of interdisciplinary phenomena within science and engineering. Therefore, it is rapidly gaining ground in the traditional engineering areas such as material science, electronics, energy, and technology in general. Nanomaterials and Nanophysics deals with the research, theory, methods and experiments in the fields such as solid state physics, optics, semiconductor physics, surfaces and interfaces, properties of materials and components on the nanoscale, polymer and composite materials, pharmaceuticals,  bandages and prosthetic devices, optical and electronic communication and data storage devices, improving fuels, materials and systems such as energy storage or solar power cells, and their measuring equipment, and nanoelectronics such as laboratory equipment and televisions. This session discusses more about Nano-Technology: Nanomaterials and Nanophysics.

Session 10 :Plasma Science & Plasma Physics

Plasma which means moldable substance is one of the four fundamental states of matter. Unlike the other three states, solid, liquid, and gas, plasma does not exist freely on the Earth's surface under normal conditions. Plasma can be artificially generated by heating or subjecting a neutral gas to a strong electromagnetic field to the point an ionized gaseous substance becomes increasingly electrically conductive, and long-range electromagnetic fields dominate the behavior of the matter. Plasma, the most common state of matter in the universe, exhibits complex and rich physics phenomena, including waves, turbulence, and interactions with materials. Studying plasmas is critical to advance technology development for practical purposes as developing functional fusion reactors and to understand the processes in stars, planets, and inter-stellar space. Plasma physics uses cutting-edge facilities and large-scale computation with an aim of obtaining comprehensive predictive understanding of plasmas in a variety of situations. This session discusses more about plasma science.

 

Session 11 :Electromagnetism and Electronics

Electronics is the discipline dealing with the development and application of devices and systems involving the flow of electrons in a vacuum, in gaseous media, and in semiconductors. It deals with electrical circuits that involve active electrical components such as vacuum tubes, transistors, diodes, integrated circuits, optoelectronics, and sensors, associated passive electrical components, and interconnection technologies. While electromagnetism is a branch of physics involving the study of the electromagnetic force, a type of physical interaction that occurs between electrically charged particles. The electromagnetic force usually exhibits electromagnetic fields such as electric fields, magnetic fields and light, and is one of the four fundamental interactions commonly called forces in nature. Lightning is an electrostatic discharge that travels between two charged regions. Electromagnetic phenomena are defined in terms of the electromagnetic force, sometimes called the Lorentz force, which includes both electricity and magnetism as different manifestations of the same phenomenon. This session discusses more about electromagnetism and electronics.

Session 12 :Applied Physics

Applied Physics is intended for a particular technological or practical use. It is usually considered as a bridge or a connection between physics and engineering. Applied physics is rooted in the fundamental truths and basic concepts of the physical sciences but is concerned with the utilization of scientific principles in practical devices and systems, and in the application of physics in other areas of science. It usually differs from engineering in that an applied physicist may not be designing something in particular, but rather is using physics or conducting physics research with the aim of developing new technologies or solving an engineering problem. This approach is similar to that of applied mathematics. This session discusses more about applied physics.

Session 13 :Modern Astrophysics and Cosmology

Cosmology deals with the study of the origin, evolution, and eventual fate of the universe. Physical cosmology is the scientific study of the universe's origin, its large-scale structures and dynamics, and its ultimate fate, as well as the scientific laws that govern these areas. Astro-particle physics is a branch of particle physics that studies elementary particles of astronomical origin and their relation to astrophysics and cosmology. It is a relatively new field of research emerging at the intersection of particle physics, astronomy, astrophysics, detector physics, relativity, solid state physics, and cosmology. Modern astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that employs the principles of physics and chemistry to ascertain the nature of the astronomical objects. Among the objects studied are the sun, other stars, galaxies, extra-solar planets, the interstellar medium and the cosmic microwave background. Their emissions are examined across all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the properties examined include luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition. This session discusses more about cosmology, modern astrophysics, and astro-particle physics. 

Session 14 :Atomic and Molecular Physics

Atomic, molecular, and optical physics (AMO) is the study of matter-matter and light-matter interactions; at the scale of one or a few atoms and energy scales around several electron volts. The three areas are closely interrelated. AMO theory includes classical, semi-classical and quantum treatments. Typically, the theory and applications of emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation from excited atoms and molecules, analysis of spectroscopy, generation of lasers and masers, and the optical properties of matter in general fall into these categories. Atomic physics is the subfield of atomic molecular & optical that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus, while molecular physics is the study of the physical properties of molecules. The term atomic physics is often associated with nuclear power and nuclear bombs, due to the synonymous use of atomic and nuclear in Standard English. Molecular physics, while closely related to atomic physics also overlaps greatly with theoretical chemistry, physical chemistry and chemical physics. This session discusses more about atomic, molecular, and optical physics (AMO).

Session 15 :Nano-Technology: Nanomaterials and Nanophysics

Nanotechnology operates on the interfaces of traditional scientific areas. It has already contributed substantially to the understanding of interdisciplinary phenomena within science and engineering. Therefore, it is rapidly gaining ground in the traditional engineering areas such as material science, electronics, energy, and technology in general. Nanomaterials and Nanophysics deals with the research, theory, methods and experiments in the fields such as solid state physics, optics, semiconductor physics, surfaces and interfaces, properties of materials and components on the nanoscale, polymer and composite materials, pharmaceuticals,  bandages and prosthetic devices, optical and electronic communication and data storage devices, improving fuels, materials and systems such as energy storage or solar power cells, and their measuring equipment, and nanoelectronics such as laboratory equipment and televisions. This session discusses more about Nano-Technology: Nanomaterials and Nanophysics.

Session 16 :Optics and Lasers

Optics and Lasers deals with the study and research on engineering and applied optics, including not only elementary ray and wave optics, but also lasers, holography, coherence, fibers, and optical waveguides. It stresses physical principles, applications, and instrumentation. A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The word laser is an abbreviated form of Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. A laser differs from other sources of light in that it emits light coherently, spatially and temporally. Spatial coherence allows a laser to be focused to a tight spot, enabling applications such as laser cutting and lithography. Optics is the branch of physics which involves the behavior and properties of light, including its interactions with matter and the construction of instruments that use or detect it. Optics usually describes the behavior of visible, ultraviolet, and infrared light. Because light is an electromagnetic wave, other forms of electromagnetic radiation such as X-rays, microwaves, and radio waves exhibit similar properties. This session discusses more about optics and lasers.

 

Session 17 :High Energy Nuclear Physics

High-energy nuclear physics studies the behavior of nuclear matter in energy regimes typical of high energy physics. The primary focus of this field is the study of heavy-ion collisions as compared to lower atomic mass atoms in other particle accelerators. At sufficient collision energies, these types of collisions are theorized to produce the quark–gluon plasma. In peripheral nuclear collisions at high energies one expects to obtain information on the electromagnetic production of leptons and mesons which are not accessible in electron-positron colliders due to their much smaller luminosities. Previous high-energy nuclear accelerator experiments have studied heavy-ion collisions using projectile energies of 1 GeV/nucleon up to 158 GeV/nucleon. This session discusses more about high energy nuclear physics

Session 18 :Material Science and Engineering

Material Science and Engineering go hand in hand in dealing with the studies on research, design, and discovery of new materials such as solids. Materials Science evolved when researchers began to use analytical thinking from chemistry, physics, and engineering to understand ancient, phenomenological observations in metallurgy and mineralogy. Materials science still incorporates elements of physics, chemistry, and engineering. Materials science and engineering has come a long way to be recognized as a specific and distinct field of science and engineering. Materials science is a syncretic discipline hybridizing metallurgy, ceramics, solid-state physics, and chemistry. It is the first example of a new academic discipline emerging by fusion rather than fission. This session discusses more about material science and engineering.

Session 19 :Magnetism and Magnetic Materials

Magnetism and Magnetic Materials deals with the research and studies on descriptive and quantitative, treating concepts, phenomena, materials and devices in a way that emphasizes numerical magnitudes, and provides a wealth of useful data. Magnetism and magnetic materials understand the physics, extension to high frequencies, the avalanche of consumer applications and most recently, the emergence of spin electronics. Magnetics in partnership with semiconductors has created the information revolution which in turn has given birth to new ways to research the subject like numerical simulation of physical theory and automatic data acquisition. Magnetism and magnetic materials owes more to metallurgy and systematic crystal chemistry than it does to quantum physics. Quantum mechanics has been of central importance for magnetism is in its interaction with electromagnetic radiation in the radiofrequency, microwave and optical ranges. This session discusses more about magnetism and magnetic materials.

Session 20 :Mathematical & Computational Physics

Mathematical physics deals with the development of mathematical methods for application to problems in physics. Mathematical Physics defines the field as the application of mathematics to problems in physics and the development of mathematical methods suitable for such applications and for the formulation of physical theories. It is a branch of applied mathematics but deals with physical problems. Computational physics deals with the study and implementation of numerical analysis to solve problems in physics for which a quantitative theory already exists. Historically speaking computational physics was the first application of modern computers in science, and is now a subset of computational science. It is sometimes regarded as a sub-discipline of theoretical physics, but others consider it an intermediate branch between theoretical and experimental physics, a third way that supplements theory and experiment.  Mathematical and Computational Physics covers quantum field theory and theory of elementary particles, fundamental problems of nuclear physics, many-body problems and statistical physics, non-relativistic quantum mechanics, and basic problems of gravitation theory. This session discusses more about mathematical and computational physics.

Session 21 :Electromagnetism and Electronics

Electronics is the discipline dealing with the development and application of devices and systems involving the flow of electrons in a vacuum, in gaseous media, and in semiconductors. It deals with electrical circuits that involve active electrical components such as vacuum tubes, transistors, diodes, integrated circuits, optoelectronics, and sensors, associated passive electrical components, and interconnection technologies. While electromagnetism is a branch of physics involving the study of the electromagnetic force, a type of physical interaction that occurs between electrically charged particles. The electromagnetic force usually exhibits electromagnetic fields such as electric fields, magnetic fields and light, and is one of the four fundamental interactions commonly called forces in nature. Lightning is an electrostatic discharge that travels between two charged regions. Electromagnetic phenomena are defined in terms of the electromagnetic force, sometimes called the Lorentz force, which includes both electricity and magnetism as different manifestations of the same phenomenon. This session discusses more about electromagnetism and electronics.

Session 22 :Medical Physics and Biophysics

Medical physics also known as biomedical physics, medical biophysics or applied physics in medicine is the application of physics concepts, theories and methods to medicine or healthcare. Medical physics deal with healthcare specialties such as diagnostic and interventional radiology also known as medical imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation protection and radiation oncology. Biophysics is an interdisciplinary science that deals with the study on the methods of physics to study biological systems. Biophysics covers all scales of biological organization, from molecular to organism and populations. Biophysical research shares significant overlap with biochemistry, molecular biology, physical chemistry, physiology, nanotechnology, bioengineering, computational biology, biomechanics and systems biology. This session discusses more about medical physics and biophysics.